10 + 10 = Ouch!!


So, I had some computer issues yesterday (not OpenInsight based I am pleased to confirm) but the end result saw me blowing my machine away and opting for a complete factory reset.  This is usually a pretty painful task, but ‘boy’, did I not know the half of it.  This posting is therefore a reminder for me and also to enable all OpenInsight installers to better prepare for their OpenInsight installations.

With my machine sitting with a newly installed copy of Windows 10, I updated my Internet Security and immediately dived into installing OpenInsight 10 on my machine – well it is the most important piece of software on my box and an application that runs my working life.  Well, I say install but I actually did what I have done a thousand times before and simply copied the RevSoft folder from my backup drive onto my new Windows 10 installation and launched the ClientInstall.exe to install those all important files that OI10 needs to operate properly. 5

Before doing anything with OpenInsight and as per the normal OpenInsight installation documentation, I took the added precaution and checked to make sure that I had the .NET Framework 3.5 and 4.6 installed on my machine.

All was good with both Frameworks displayed in the “Turn Windows features on or off” window.

I therefore ‘thought’ that I was good to go and copied over my backed up RevSoft folder, then I located and launched the ClientInstall.exe file using the ‘Run As Administrator’ option.  However, half way through the install I got the following warning.

1

Now, I know that I don’t have the later .NET Framework installed, so I clicked ‘Yes’ to launch the Microsoft webpage.  This presented me with the .NET Framework 4.7.1 option front and centre and that seemed like a good choice – well it can’t hurt to have the latest version.

Alas, after downloading the file and running it, I was presented with a Microsoft .NET Framework Blocking Issue warning and the only option is to Close out of the installation.   2

OK, so the OI system did say that I needed 4.7, so back to the Microsoft website and towards the bottom of the page are several options including 4.7.  Naturally, I downloaded and installed that version.  Alas, the exact same Blocking result:

3.png

I knew that I’d had the earlier version installed, so I tried 4.6 but, as expected I was told that it is already installed.  Out of desperation I thought I’d try the 4.6.2  version and success, it ran through a full installation.

4

 

Jumping back into the OI ClientInstall I ran the file and crossed my fingers.  Again, the installation failed.  OI really does want 4.7 and nothing else will do.

Time to dive into the ‘More Information’ link and something that I really should have done first off.  This presented me with a long page of different things that can affect the .NET installer but towards the bottom covering just a couple of lines is a note about the .NET Framework 4.7 needing the Windows 10 Creators edition.  Checking my machine and because this is a machine that is a couple of years old, I naturally have an older version.

So, into Update and Security and I began to download the upgrades.

6

With the first set of upgrades installed, I ran the updates check again and the system went off to pull down the Creators Fall Edition, one heck of a long download and almost as long to install.  This process began at around 10:00 hrs this morning.  It’s now gone 16:00 hrs and the Creators Edition is finally installed.  One last update check and one last batch before a final check and we are finally up to date.

7

This time when I ran the ClientInstall, the system ran through as expected with no call out to Microsoft and no need to manually install the Microsoft .NET Framework 4.7, that appears to be installed as part of the update.

8

Somewhat relieved that all now appeared good, despite nearly a whole working day taken to run the upgrades, I launched OpenInsight 10 and my application and it is now functioning exactly as expected – PHEW!!!

So, what is the moral of this sorry tale or woe, angst and dead ends.

The Number One Rule:  Make sure that you or your client have your windows 10 machines fully upgraded BEFORE you step through the door to undertake any software installation that needs a .NET Framework and especially OpenInsight 10.

I’d have hated to have arrived on a client’s site to install their new OI10 based system, to find myself sitting there waiting for Windows 10 machines to update.  One would hope that the machines will have been installed for a while and be fully updated, but you just know that there will be people who only opened the box and turned it on that morning.

Also, be warned that if you have to blow your machine away and back to factory settings and it’s running an earlier Windows 10 release, you will have to factor in a long wait.  I guess that there can be something said for keeping mirror image backups.

So, now that I have my OpenInsight 10 working you’d think that I’m about to dive in and continue with my conversion.  Nope, I’m off to coach archery and OI10 will have to wait until a little later.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s