10 + 10 = Ouch!!


So, I had some computer issues yesterday (not OpenInsight based I am pleased to confirm) but the end result saw me blowing my machine away and opting for a complete factory reset.  This is usually a pretty painful task, but ‘boy’, did I not know the half of it.  This posting is therefore a reminder for me and also to enable all OpenInsight installers to better prepare for their OpenInsight installations.

With my machine sitting with a newly installed copy of Windows 10, I updated my Internet Security and immediately dived into installing OpenInsight 10 on my machine – well it is the most important piece of software on my box and an application that runs my working life.  Well, I say install but I actually did what I have done a thousand times before and simply copied the RevSoft folder from my backup drive onto my new Windows 10 installation and launched the ClientInstall.exe to install those all important files that OI10 needs to operate properly. 5

Before doing anything with OpenInsight and as per the normal OpenInsight installation documentation, I took the added precaution and checked to make sure that I had the .NET Framework 3.5 and 4.6 installed on my machine.

All was good with both Frameworks displayed in the “Turn Windows features on or off” window.

I therefore ‘thought’ that I was good to go and copied over my backed up RevSoft folder, then I located and launched the ClientInstall.exe file using the ‘Run As Administrator’ option.  However, half way through the install I got the following warning.

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Now, I know that I don’t have the later .NET Framework installed, so I clicked ‘Yes’ to launch the Microsoft webpage.  This presented me with the .NET Framework 4.7.1 option front and centre and that seemed like a good choice – well it can’t hurt to have the latest version.

Alas, after downloading the file and running it, I was presented with a Microsoft .NET Framework Blocking Issue warning and the only option is to Close out of the installation.   2

OK, so the OI system did say that I needed 4.7, so back to the Microsoft website and towards the bottom of the page are several options including 4.7.  Naturally, I downloaded and installed that version.  Alas, the exact same Blocking result:

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I knew that I’d had the earlier version installed, so I tried 4.6 but, as expected I was told that it is already installed.  Out of desperation I thought I’d try the 4.6.2  version and success, it ran through a full installation.

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Jumping back into the OI ClientInstall I ran the file and crossed my fingers.  Again, the installation failed.  OI really does want 4.7 and nothing else will do.

Time to dive into the ‘More Information’ link and something that I really should have done first off.  This presented me with a long page of different things that can affect the .NET installer but towards the bottom covering just a couple of lines is a note about the .NET Framework 4.7 needing the Windows 10 Creators edition.  Checking my machine and because this is a machine that is a couple of years old, I naturally have an older version.

So, into Update and Security and I began to download the upgrades.

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With the first set of upgrades installed, I ran the updates check again and the system went off to pull down the Creators Fall Edition, one heck of a long download and almost as long to install.  This process began at around 10:00 hrs this morning.  It’s now gone 16:00 hrs and the Creators Edition is finally installed.  One last update check and one last batch before a final check and we are finally up to date.

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This time when I ran the ClientInstall, the system ran through as expected with no call out to Microsoft and no need to manually install the Microsoft .NET Framework 4.7, that appears to be installed as part of the update.

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Somewhat relieved that all now appeared good, despite nearly a whole working day taken to run the upgrades, I launched OpenInsight 10 and my application and it is now functioning exactly as expected – PHEW!!!

So, what is the moral of this sorry tale or woe, angst and dead ends.

The Number One Rule:  Make sure that you or your client have your windows 10 machines fully upgraded BEFORE you step through the door to undertake any software installation that needs a .NET Framework and especially OpenInsight 10.

I’d have hated to have arrived on a client’s site to install their new OI10 based system, to find myself sitting there waiting for Windows 10 machines to update.  One would hope that the machines will have been installed for a while and be fully updated, but you just know that there will be people who only opened the box and turned it on that morning.

Also, be warned that if you have to blow your machine away and back to factory settings and it’s running an earlier Windows 10 release, you will have to factor in a long wait.  I guess that there can be something said for keeping mirror image backups.

So, now that I have my OpenInsight 10 working you’d think that I’m about to dive in and continue with my conversion.  Nope, I’m off to coach archery and OI10 will have to wait until a little later.

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OI10 Splitter Bars – Ouch and a smile.


splitterOn the whole, my OpenInsight 10 (OI10) Beta 4 conversion has been a major success and I’m now using the application on a daily basis and working on the UI to make it cleaner using the new tools in OI10.

However, one gotcha which we should all already be aware of, is the splitter bars that were introduced in OI9.  In that version, you simply dropped the controls on the form and it did its best to resize controls (usually edit tables).  The downside for me was a flickering screen as the form constantly redrew whilst the bar was being dragged by the user.

In OI10, Carl has introduced a new ‘MOVE’ event which enables developers to very quickly and easily handle the resizing of the controls to best suit the application.  In my example, I have a form with three panels (Groupboxes) and on each panel is an editable.  The panels are then set to autosize and the following code is added to the upper and lower Splitter Bars to managed the moving of the bars as needed.  The code below is taken from the Upper Splitter bar’s MOVE event.

Declare Subroutine Set_Property

// Adjust the window's controls as the user moves the horizontal splitter bar.

   // Get the bar "thickness"
   barH = Get_Property( ctrlEntID, 'HEIGHT' )
   
   // Get the bar initial position
   barP = Get_Property( ctrlEntID, 'TOP', YCoord )
   
   // Move the bar
   Set_Property( ctrlEntID, 'TOP', YCoord )

   // How far did the bar Move 
   barM = barP - YCoord
   
   // Move the upper panel control
   valPanelUpper = @window:'.GRP_ALF30DAYSPLUS'
   Set_Property( valPanelUpper, 'BOTTOM', yCoord - 4 )

   // Move the lower panel control and reset the height
   valPanelLower = @Window: '.GRP_ALF30'
   Set_Property( valPanelLower, "TOP", yCoord  + barH + 4 )
   
   valPanelHeight = Get_Property(valPanelLower, 'HEIGHT')
   Set_Property( valPanelLower, 'HEIGHT', valPanelHeight + barM )
    
return 1

Disclaimer: The above code is written by me as a non professional developer.  Whilst it works, it is not optimised, does not include any error trapping and does not promote best practice.  The above code includes comments to explain what it does.

I was initially disappointed that I would have to write code to manage the splitter bars, but now that this is done I really like the way that I have control over the controls that move and that the form no longer flickers when the splitter bars are moved.

For more details about OI10 changes, please check out Carl’s OI10 Blog.

 

Resolving Open File Security Warning when Launching OpenInsight.


OInsight.exe File Security Warning Message

If you deploy OpenInsight systems and come across the Open File Security Warning in Windows, then Jared at SRP has three very useful options for you to consider and which will enhance and ease your OpenInsight deployments.

Jared has blogged the options in details and they can be found at the URL copied below.

http://blog.srpcs.com/resolving-open-file-security-warning-when-launching-openinsight/

 

OpenInsight 9.4 “Roll Up” Patch v3


OpenInsight 9.4

 Revelation Software have recently released a third roll up patch for OpenInsight making it much easier for developers and users to keep their systems up to date.

This patch includes all previous fixes for OpenInsight 9.4 and replaces the original  “Roll Up” Patch v1 released on March 3, 2016 and the second “Roll Up” Patch v2 released on March 8, 2016. The patches included are as follows:

  • BUTTONDOWN Event Handler Patch for OI 9.4
  • SQL Connector Patch for OI 9.4 v2
  • Buffer Overflow Error Patch for OI 9.4 v2
  • RevelationDotNet 9.4 “Roll Up” Patch
  • RTI_TASKMANAGER 9.4 Patch v2
  • O4W Validation Patch for OI 9.4
  • QBF Patch for OI 9.4
  • Arev32 Descending Sort Issue Patch for OI 9.4 v2
  • Single Sign On Patch for OI 9.4
  • CTODICT.MFS Patch for OI 9.4 v2
  • Arev32 Conversion Utility Patch for OI 9.4
  • Socket Functions Patch for OI 9.4
  • O4W Popup Patch for OI 9.4
  • Base64 Encode/Decode Patch for OI 9.4
  • PREVVAL Patch for OI 9.4
  • O4WGRAPHDATA Patch for OI 9.4
  • RTICDOMAIL Patch for OI 9.4
  • Banded Report Writer Patch for OI 9.4 v2
  • Engine Server Patch for OpenInsight 9.4
  • Listbox Patch for OpenInsight 9.4

Works members can download this patch from the Works Downloads section of our web site.

List User Locks Administration Tool for OI v9.4


OpenInsight 9.4

Revelation Software have released a new RDK via the WORKS section of http://www.revelation.com which contains an updated LIST_USER_LOCKS window, along with supporting LIST_USER_LOCKS and RTI_LH_INFO procedures.

This utility has been tested with OpenInsight 9.4 and above and the Universal Driver 4.7.2 and Universal Driver 5.0.0.5.

Execute the window LIST_USER_LOCKS. The window will display a list of locked records. Each line item will display computer name, volume, table and record keys. With the Universal Driver 5.0.0.5 the computer name will include the network logon and process ID so that you can determine exactly which session holds the lock on a terminal server.

Works members can download this utility from the Works Downloads section of the web site.
Read On….

Listbox Patch


OI Eye SquareFollowing the release of the Windows 10 Creators Update by Microsoft recently, Revelation found that OpenInsight Listboxes were affected by the update.

A Listbox Patch for OpenInsight 9.4 has therefore been released to address this issue.   The Windows 10 Creators Update has caused Listboxes to no longer display properly in OpenInsight 9.4 and this new patch resolves this issue through the replacement of the existing OInsight.exe.

OpenInsight will show the version as 9.4.2 which can be viewed in the top left corner of the IDE.  OpenInsight Works Members can download the Listbox Patch for OpenInsight 9.4 from the Works Download section of our web site.  If you are an end user, please contact your application author to obtain your application upgrade accordingly.

OECGI4 and REST


didyouknowoiOne of the upgraded features of OpenInsight 10 will be OECGI4, the newest version of our web support routines.

One of the enhancements to OECGI4 (available as both a Windows executable for Windows web servers, and as a PHP routine for Windows or Linux web servers) is additional support for some of the less well known “verbs” used in the HTTP/HTTPS protocol. When using OECGI to support or access web pages, the HTTP and HTTPS protocols use the “POST” and “GET” verbs to submit, and request, information respectively. These have been in common use since the World Wide Web first standardized on the HTTP/HTTPS protocols. But in addition to the familiar POST and GET, HTTP/HTTPS defines other verbs that can be useful when writing RESTful interfaces.

REST stands for REpresentational State Transfer, and is in a way the underlying principle of the Web. When a client makes an HTTP or HTTPS request from a server, the response from the server contains not only the specific information needed to answer that request, but also details that the client can use to get more information, all “bundled up” in the answer. For example, when a request for a web page is made, the web page may contain images, or stylesheets, or script calls. The client has no way of knowing, in advance, if there is one, or a hundred, images in the returned page – but the page itself contains the instructions the client can use to retrieve the images, or the style sheets, or the script pages. The page may even include the data and instructions needed for the client to retrieve other pages (via links, or via pagination). Because of its familiarity, this may seem simple and straightforward when it comes to web pages, but the concept (that nothing is “predefined”, but rather everything is embodied in the responses) can be expanded upon to make much more advanced inter-operating systems.

REST can be used, not just for retrieving and updating web pages, but also to enable computer programs, as well as people, to interact with web services. By building a RESTful interface, a web service designer opens up their web site to the possibility of having other software query it for information, or update it with changes, thus allowing anyone else to put different user interfaces (if any!) on these interactions. While not required for REST, using HTTP and HTTPS, and the additional HTTP/HTTPS verbs, is currently the most common way of implementing this.

In addition to “POST” and “GET”, HTTP/HTTPS (and OECGI4) support the verbs “PUT”, “DELETE”, and “PATCH.” In the RESTful programming world, the “GET” verb is used to retrieve information – either about the other available interfaces this RESTful interface supports, or information about specific “objects”. For example, if you were to create a customer maintenance web service, the “GET” verb might be used to retrieve the list of customers, or the information about a particular customer – or the list of commands that can be applied to those customer “objects”. The “POST” verb is commonly used to create new “objects” – in our example, the “POST” verb might be used to create a new customer. “PUT” and “PATCH” both are commonly used to update existing “objects” – in our example, either “PUT” or “PATCH” may be used to change the customer’s phone number (PUT may wipe out any data in fields that aren’t specified, while PATCH should only update the specified fields). Finally, “DELETE” is most commonly used to remove “objects”.

When using OECGI4, you can examine the request parameter to find the “request method” (defined in the INET_EQUATES insert), and – with the appropriate INET_XXX stored procedures – you can begin to implement your own web service.

Interested in learning more about RESTful programming? For additional information, please see the following resources:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/671118/what-exactly-is-restful-programming

http://blog.octo.com/en/design-a-rest-api/