What is Volume Shadow Copy Service-based backup?


Margaret Rouse of WhatIs.com has published an article titled “What is Volume shadow Copy Service-based backup?” that we at Revelation Software would like to share so that you can take advantage of the full potential of the Universal Driver NUL 5.0.

A Volume Shadow Copy Service-based backup (VSS-based backup) is a Windows service that captures and creates snapshots called shadow copies. VSS, also known as Volume Snapshot Service, operates at the block level of the file system and enables virtual server backup in Microsoft environments.

In addition to the service itself, Windows VSS has three major components:

VSS writer: Each VSS-aware application installs its own VSS writer to a computer during the initial installation. The VSS writer tells the backup tool how to back up the application and its data. VSS writers are commonly included within database-driven applications such as Active Directory or Exchange Server. Database servers such as Microsoft SQL Server also contain VSS writers.

VSS requestor: The VSS requestor initiates the backup process. Any application that needs to quiesce data for capture can play the role of VSS requestor. In a majority of cases the backup application acts as the VSS requestor.

VSS provider: VSS providers allow the VSS backup process to work with the system’s hardware and operating system (OS). Providers are modular, and a single system often contains multiple providers. OS providers allow VSS to be operating system-aware. Similarly, hardware providers act as a proxy between the VSS service and hardware components such as storage arrays. For example, a storage-level hardware provider may create the snapshot used during the backup process.

Read On…

Conference


2016conf

If you are interested in OpenInsight 10 and wondering what the forthcoming conference has on store for you, then you’ll be interested in the Revelation Conference website which is now live.

If you are an OpenInsight developer or a MultiValue developer using one of the main MV tools and you are still not interested and I can’t see why you would, please checkout the conference website and the Topics section specifically before you decline to take advantage of this learning experience.  You just might be missing the opportunity to take your applications to the next level the easy way.

The Revelation Conference is the main event on Revelation’s event calendar and this years event looks to be bigger, better and more appealing to OpenInsight and other MultiValue developers than ever before.

This dedicated website provides you with all of the information that you need about the conference.  It has details about the location (Orlando, Florida), you’ll find out all about the presentations and the absolute wealth of information available, about the speakers themselves and more.

I found the last conference invaluable in preparing me for the forthcoming OpenInsight 10 release and this years event looks to put even more detail into our hands.  In doing so, Revelation are clearly using this major event to empower OpenInsight developers with regards to the new version and help them to become more prepared for the new release and ready for the wealth of change and good things buried on the 1,000,000 plus lines of code that has changed and the numerous new features for both developers and users.

The graphic above uses the word ‘Faster’ and is one of several that I could have borrowed from the new site.  I chose faster because it is something that all of my customers are asking for and I believe that the new version will be faster – both with regards to development and the running of deployed systems.

Want to know more – checkout the Conference website and get your place booked ASAP.

I look forward to seeing you in Florida in April.

BTW – The conference website also includes a downloadable conference brochure and the Early Bird registration is available until February 29, 2016.

SRP Editor


It is proving to be a busy week with news and information from the Revelation community.  Yesterday we had the Sprezzatura article about the Calculator Trick and today SRP are back with an update on their popular Editor control.

In their latest blog article they explore the metadata record structure that is a feature of their new service module metadata which was announced recently.

Click here for more details.

‘I never knew that’, The Calculator Trick


After a relatively quiet period, it is great to be back blogging again and sharing news and technical content relating to OpenInsight and Revelation Software in general.

OI10 is now just around the corner and I can’t wait for conference in April to see the new features, new look interface and all the good stuff coming in the new version of OpenInsight.

I hope to have more and more information about the new release of OpenInsight over the coming weeks leading up to and following the conference.  In the meantime, it is SRP and Sprezzatura that are keeping me busy with great technical content being published on their sites.

Today it is Sprezzatura’s turn and they have highlighted a little known, but highly useful tip for tracking down OLE errors in OpenInsight applications.

Tracking down OLE errors in OpenInsight can be more than a little tricky at times but last week, the guys learned that this task can be made super simple using the Windows Calculator.  As one of them said following the sharing of this tip ‘I never knew that’ and that is a phrase that I don’t often hear from the Sprezzatura boys.

The article explains how they went from a reported error of ” ” from the third party system (yes, you read that right, in it entirety the error was nothing, nada, zip) to a solution and another happy supported client.

Click here to read the full article.

 

UD5 vs UD4.7


benchtestresultsI don’t look at the Knowledge Base on www.revelation.com enough and I’m often surprised at the information that resides there.  Today was no exception and just proves how long it was since I took a look and how important it is to check there fore time to time.

I have been talking to a few people about the UD5 and the upgrade process from earlier versions of the Universal Driver and the benefits of the upgrade and performance ‘always’ comes up.  I was therefore pleasantly surprised to see that Revelation have recently published some bench test results which compare the Universal Driver 4.7 to the Universal Driver 5.0, running both with and without encryption.

There are four tests which were completed using all three configurations (UD4.7 without encryption, UD 5.0 without encryption and UD 5.0 with encryption).  The results are nicely summarised in a graphic and there are also detailed screen shots of the results screens and the parameters used for each of the tests – totally transparent reporting.

I’ll leave you to review the knowledge base article, but it was good to see that the UD 5.0 is consistently faster than the UD4.7 when running without encryption. 

Running with encryption sees a decrease in performance of around 2 to 2.5 times the time taken in the UD 4.7 without encryption.Which is expected for obvious reasons.

Please see www.revsoft.co.uk for more details about the Universal Driver or contact your local Revelation representative or application author to discuss your upgrade to the UD5.

Delving Deep into the OI BRW


BRW

I have been a long term fan of the new OpenInsight Banded Report Writer and those goes back to it’s introduction early in the OI 9.x series of releases.  So much so, I decided to take the stand at one of our RUGs and attempt to show our attendees what the new tool set was all about and what it is capable of.

It is a very powerful tool with a familiar design interface that most developers and power users should be happy with following a quick run through the BRW Reference Guide and working through the first few pages of the guide which builds your first report.

However, Don at SRP is in the process of taking the BRW and delving deep into the tool and he aims to reveal how developers can better understand the tool, its configuration and how to get the most from this powerful addition to the suite of OI tools.

His first article has just appeared on the SRP blog and its looks at Unpacking CFG_OIBRW, or more specifically the options for configuring the OI BRW for use and the advantages and disadvantages of each of the options.  There is also a link to the Wiki that he has set up and in which he plans to continue to delve deeper into the tool over the coming weeks.

If you are working with OI 9.x, planning a move to OI 9.x or want to get more from your reporting within OpenInsight, then this series looks set to be a must read.